Posts tagged MR. SOEWARNO

THE BIGGEST TIGER SEIZED OVER $14.5B IN ASSETS OF FORMER NATIONAL SECURITY CHIEF, FAMILY + CLOSE ASSOCIATES

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IF YOU HAVE EVIDENCE REGARDING THE SOPHISTICATED, ORGANIZED, INTERNATIONAL MONEY LAUNDERING OPERATION CONCEALING ITS CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES AMONG THE INTERNATIONAL BROKER COMMUNITY WITH COUNTERFEIT BANK DOCUMENTS + TRANSACTIONS ON THE INTERBANK SCREEN THAT WE ARE INVESTIGATING + EXPOSING ON THIS WEBSITE, CONTACT US AT THE SKYPE NAMES ON TOP OF THIS PAGE.

IF YOU HAVE EVIDENCE OF PRIVATE BANKING CORRUPTION, TAX EVASION, MONEY LAUNDERING or TERRORISM FINANCING, CONTACT US AT THE SKYPE NAMES ON TOP OF THIS PAGE.

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ZHOU YONGKANG WITH 300 FAMILY + CLOSE ASSOCIATES HAVE ASSETS FROZEN BY CHINA

http://www.cnbc.com/id/101536904

* Investigation into Zhou Yongkang has broadened in past four months

* Relatives and associates have had bank accounts frozen – sources

* Bonds, apartments, cars, paintings, cash and gold seized – sources

* Most seized assets not in Zhou’s name – sources

* More than 300 relatives, allies, staff detained or questioned – sources

BEIJING, March 30 (Reuters) – Chinese authorities have seized assets worth at least 90 billion yuan ($14.5 billion) from family members and associates of retired domestic security tsar Zhou Yongkang, who is at the centre of China’s biggest corruption scandal in more than six decades, two sources said.

More than 300 of Zhou’s relatives, political allies, proteges and staff have also been taken into custody or questioned in the past four months, the sources, who have been briefed on the investigation, told Reuters.

The sheer size of the asset seizures and the scale of the investigations into the people around Zhou – both unreported until now – make the corruption probe unprecedented in modern China and would appear to show that President Xi Jinping is tackling graft at the highest levels.

But it may also be driven partly by political payback after Zhou angered leaders such as Xi by opposing the ouster of former high-flying politician Bo Xilai, who was jailed for life in September for corruption and abuse of power.

Zhou, 71, has been under virtual house arrest since authorities began formally investigating him late last year. He is the most senior Chinese politician to be ensnared in a corruption investigation since the Communist Party swept to power in 1949.

“It’s the ugliest in the history of the New China,” said one of the sources, who has ties to the leadership, requesting anonymity to avoid repercussions for speaking to the foreign media about elite politics.

The government has yet to make any official statement about Zhou or the case against him and it has not been possible to contact Zhou, his family, associates or staff for comment. It is not clear if any of them have lawyers.

The party’s anti-corruption watchdog and the prosecutor’s office did not respond to requests for comment. In the secretive world of China’s Communist Party, targets of its investigations usually disappear, often for months or even years, until an official announcement is made.

Xi ordered a task force formed in late November or early December to look into accusations against Zhou, sources have previously told Reuters. They have not said what the allegations were except that they were related to violating party discipline, official jargon for corruption.

A third source with ties to the leadership said Zhou had refused to cooperate with investigators, insisting he was the victim of a power struggle.

“Zhou Yongkang is tough and claims it’s political persecution,” the source said.

Zhou rose through the ranks of China’s oil and gas sector before joining the elite Politburo Standing Committee in 2007, where as domestic security chief his budget exceeded defence spending. He retired in 2012 and was last seen at an alumni event at the China University of Petroleum on Oct. 1.

BONDS, VILLAS, CARS, LIQUOR, GOLD

The first two sources said prosecutors and the party’s anti-corruption watchdog had frozen bank accounts with deposits totaling 37 billion yuan and seized domestic and overseas bonds with a combined value of 51 billion yuan after raiding homes in Beijing, Shanghai and five provinces.

Investigators had also confiscated about 300 apartments and villas worth around 1.7 billion yuan, antiques and contemporary paintings with a market value of 1 billion yuan and more than 60 vehicles, the sources added. Other items seized included expensive liquor, gold, silver and cash in local and foreign currencies.

The seized assets belonged to those in custody, the sources said, without saying how many people in total had been detained compared to just questioned. Most of the assets were not in Zhou’s name, they added.

According to the sources, the seized assets had a combined value of at least 90 billion yuan, although it was unclear what share of that total was ill-gotten and would be turned over to the state.

The amount eventually made public could be smaller to avoid embarrassing the party and angering ordinary Chinese, the sources said.

Such asset seizures, while large, are not uncommon in China, where excess has often been revealed from graft probes in recent years. In January, the respected Chinese magazine Caixin said authorities had seized a solid gold statue of Mao Zedong among other things from the mansion of a senior military officer who has been under investigation since he was sacked in 2012.

LONG LIST

The first two sources added that more than 10 of Zhou’s relatives had been detained. They included Zhou’s one-time television reporter wife Jia Xiaoye, his eldest son from a previous marriage Zhou Bin, Zhou Bin’s in-laws and Zhou Yongkang’s brother.

About 10 officials who held a rank equivalent to at least vice minister were also under investigation, the sources said.

Among them were Jiang Jiemin, former chairman of both state energy giant PetroChina and its parent China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), former Vice Minister of Public Security Li Dongsheng and Ji Wenlin, ex-vice governor of the southernmost island province of Hainan.

Chinese state media has announced that all three were being investigated for serious violations of discipline. They were either proteges or aides to Zhou.

Reuters has been unable to contact the three men. It’s unclear if they have lawyers.

More than 20 of Zhou’s bodyguards, secretaries and drivers had also been detained, the sources said. Many other family members and associates had been questioned.

THE BIGGEST TIGER?

Since becoming head of the party in late 2012 and then president a year ago, Xi has vowed to go after both powerful “tigers” and lowly “flies” in an effort to crack down on the corruption he says threatens the party’s very existence.

But Xi is in a dilemma over whether to put Zhou on trial lest it further undermine public faith in the party, the three sources said, referring to the growing disillusionment in China over rampant graft and abuse of power.

Xi would also risk alienating other party elders who fear that they and their families could be next, political analysts say.

Putting someone as powerful as Zhou in the dock would be a political decision that only Xi could make after getting the consensus of senior party members, Xi’s predecessors and other retired top officials, they say.

In ordering the investigation, Xi broke with an unwritten rule that incumbent and retired members of the Standing Committee were immune from prosecution.

As a member of the Standing Committee, the apex of power in China, and a former domestic security chief, Zhou would have intimate knowledge of the skeletons in the party’s closet.

It is still unclear exactly why Zhou has been targeted, though an early sign that he might have overstepped was when he retired and the position of domestic security chief was dropped from the Standing Committee.

Sources have also said Zhou angered Xi and other leaders over Bo Xilai, whose career was ended in 2012 by a murder scandal in which his wife was eventually convicted of poisoning a British businessman who had been a family friend.

Before Bo’s downfall, Zhou had recommended that Bo succeed him as domestic security chief, multiple sources with direct knowledge of the matter have said. ($1 = 6.2122 Chinese yuan)

ABDOUL AZIZ WANE LEAVES NOTORIOUS RSI BANK PLC

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IF YOU HAVE EVIDENCE REGARDING THE SOPHISTICATED, ORGANIZED, INTERNATIONAL MONEY LAUNDERING OPERATION CONCEALING ITS CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES AMONG THE INTERNATIONAL BROKER COMMUNITY WITH COUNTERFEIT BANK DOCUMENTS + TRANSACTIONS ON THE INTERBANK SCREEN THAT WE ARE INVESTIGATING + EXPOSING ON THIS WEBSITE, CONTACT US AT THE SKYPE NAMES ON TOP OF THIS PAGE.

IF YOU HAVE EVIDENCE OF PRIVATE BANKING CORRUPTION, TAX EVASION, MONEY LAUNDERING or TERRORISM FINANCING, CONTACT US AT THE SKYPE NAMES ON TOP OF THIS PAGE.

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Abdoul Aziz Wane
Abdoul Aziz Wane

Finance Executive and CEO of WaneCorp™

Current
  1. WaneCorp™,
  2. The International Finance Corporation -The World Bank
Previous
  1. The International Finance Corporation – The World Bank,
  2. A2F Consulting,
  3. information for development (infoDev) – The World Bank Group
Education
  1. The George Washington University – School of Business

 

ABDOUL AZIZ WANE AT RSI BANK PLC

at RSI

ABDOUL AZIZ WANE NOT AT RSI BANK PLC

not at RSI

FCA WARNING ABOUT RSI BANK PLC

 

http://www.fca.org.uk/news/warnings/rsi-bank-plc

 

RSI Bank Plc

Published: 05/08/2013   Last Modified : 26/03/2014

We believe this firm has been providing financial services or products in the UK without our authorisation. Find out why to be especially wary of dealing with this unauthorised firm and how to protect yourself from scammers.

Almost all firms and individuals offering, promoting or selling financial services or products in the UK have to be authorised by us.

However, some firms act without our authorisation and some knowingly run scams like share fraud.

RSI Bank PLC is registered with the FCA for anti-money laundering purposes only. It is not permitted to carry out any activities for which FCA authorisation is required.

RSI Bank Plc

Address: C/o Coddan CPM Ltd, 124 Baker Street, London, W1U 6TY

Suite 2, 80 Lawrie Park Road, London, SE26 6DX

1 Turnpike Lane, 1st Floor – Suite # 9, Chris Aria House, London, N8 0EP

Tel: +44 20 3286 7229

Website: www.rsiplc.com

How to protect yourself

We strongly advise you to only deal with financial firms that are authorised by us, and check the Financial Services Register to ensure they are. It has information on firms and individuals that are, or have been, regulated by us.

If a firm does not appear on the Register but claims it does, contact our Consumer Helpline on 0800 111 6768.

There are more steps you should take to protect yourself from unauthorised firms.

You should also be aware that if you give money to an unauthorised firm, you will not be covered by the Financial Ombudsman Service orFinancial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) if things go wrong.

Report an unauthorised firm

If you think you have been approached by an unauthorised firm or contacted about a scam, you should contact our Consumer Helpline on 0800 111 6768. If you were offered, bought or sold shares, you can use our share fraud reporting form.

You can see more ways to report an unauthorised firm and find out what to do if you have been scammed.

 

 

SONG LIN MISTRESS LEADS TO INTERNAL UBS INVESTIGATION

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IF YOU HAVE EVIDENCE REGARDING THE SOPHISTICATED, ORGANIZED, INTERNATIONAL MONEY LAUNDERING OPERATION CONCEALING ITS CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES AMONG THE INTERNATIONAL BROKER COMMUNITY WITH COUNTERFEIT BANK DOCUMENTS + TRANSACTIONS ON THE INTERBANK SCREEN THAT WE ARE INVESTIGATING + EXPOSING ON THIS WEBSITE, CONTACT US AT THE SKYPE NAMES ON TOP OF THIS PAGE.

IF YOU HAVE EVIDENCE OF PRIVATE BANKING CORRUPTION, TAX EVASION, MONEY LAUNDERING or TERRORISM FINANCING, CONTACT US AT THE SKYPE NAMES ON TOP OF THIS PAGE.

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SONG LIN #3

HK BANKS HIRED MANY CHILDREN + RELATIVES OF CHINA VIPs

http://www.freenewspos.com/news/article/d/529048/today/ubs-launches-internal-probe-as-banker-is-named-in-affair-graft-allegations-against-state-firm-chairman

 

Swiss bank UBS has launched an internal investigation into a senior Hong Kong-based banker, just one day after a Chinese journalist and whistle blower accused her of having an extramarital affair with the chairman of a state-owned conglomerate and helping him transfer and launder large amounts of money gained from alleged corrupt deals.

 

The bank’s legal and compliance department has opened an internal investigation on Helen Yang, also known as Yang Lijuan, an investment banker based in Hong Kong, two sources familiar with the matter told the South China Morning Post.

Yang’s responsibilities at the bank include liaison with the bank’s corporate clients, some of whom are Chinese state-owned enterprises based in the mainland, the sources told the Post.

Wang Wenzhi, a Chinese journalist who last year publicly accused Song Lin, the 51-year-old chairman of state-owned conglomerate China Resources, of corruption, renewed his allegations against Song in an online post yesterday, alleging that Yang was a “mistress” of Song’s, and had helped him transfer and launder illicit gains.

Wang is a senior reporter at the Economic Information Daily, a newspaper controlled by China’s official Xinhua News Agency.

In a letter posted on his Weibo social media account on Tuesday, addressed to the Communist Party’s central discipline committee, Wang said Song had “used his work influence” to help Yang get jobs at UBS’s Hong Kong and Shanghai branches, after the duo developed an alleged affair.

“Yang Lijuan then became an important channel for Song Lin to accept bribes and launder money,” Wang wrote. But he did not say if Yang had used her position at the bank to carry out these alleged illegal acts.

The order for an internal investigation on Yang came directly from UBS head office in Switzerland, after the company learned of the latest the allegations against Yang and Song, sources told the Post.

Song had quickly hit back at the new allegations. In a statement posted on the official website of China Resources on Wednesday morning, Song said he was “extremely indignant” at the accusations in Wang’s online letter.

“These allegations are pure fabrication and vicious defamation,” the statement said. Song also said he would take legal actions against the “rumour-mongers and libelers” for civilian and criminal responsibilities.

Wang Wenzhi, the whistle blower, had also alleged that Yang helped Song channel illegally obtained assets abroad. Yang now owns assets worth over one billion yuan, some under her own name and others under her relatives’ names, Wang wrote in his online letter.

The assets include high-end properties in Suzhou, Changzhou, Shanghai, and Hong Kong, as well as large amounts of money deposited in domestic and foreign banks, Wang said.

A UBS spokesman declined to comment on Wednesday. Yang and Song could not be immediately reached for comment.

The UBS investigation came on the heels of a series of controversies over the hiring practices at global investment banks in China. Top banks such as JP Morgan, Goldman Sachs, Citi, Morgan Stanley, UBS, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank and Bank of America Merrill Lynch are under investigation by US regulators over whether they have inappropriately hired the children and relatives of well-connected politicians and businessmen in exchange for winning business.

In his letter, Wang asked the Party’s discipline committee to launch an official investigation into Song and his alleged relationship with the banker, and said he would submit all the evidence in his possession to assist with the probe.

Last year, Wang publicly accused Song and other senior managers of intentionally overpaying in a 2010 acquisition of a Shanxi-based coking coal firm that “led to the loss of billions in state-owned assets”.

China Resources (Holdings) Company Limited, a Hong Kong-registered conglomerate, issued a statement at the time saying the accusations were libellous, and had negatively affected the company and the image of its management.

SONG LIN: THE CHAIRMAN + HIS MONEY LAUNDERING MISTRESS AT UBS HK

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IF YOU HAVE EVIDENCE REGARDING THE SOPHISTICATED, ORGANIZED, INTERNATIONAL MONEY LAUNDERING OPERATION CONCEALING ITS CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES AMONG THE INTERNATIONAL BROKER COMMUNITY WITH COUNTERFEIT BANK DOCUMENTS + TRANSACTIONS ON THE INTERBANK SCREEN THAT WE ARE INVESTIGATING + EXPOSING ON THIS WEBSITE, CONTACT US AT THE SKYPE NAMES ON TOP OF THIS PAGE.

IF YOU HAVE EVIDENCE OF PRIVATE BANKING CORRUPTION, TAX EVASION, MONEY LAUNDERING or TERRORISM FINANCING, CONTACT US AT THE SKYPE NAMES ON TOP OF THIS PAGE.

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HIS MISTRESS WORKED AT UBS IN HK

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/d05f2cae-c6da-11e3-889e-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2zQhmbG8w

The chairman of one of China’s largest state-owned conglomerates is being investigated by the Communist party after he was publicly accused of massive corruption and of having an extramarital affair with a UBS banker.

 

Song Lin, chairman of China Resources, has been placed under investigation on “suspicion of serious violations of Communist party discipline and the law”, according to a one-line statement from the body in charge of tackling corruption.

 

 

 

Such announcements are usually only made after the target has been taken into custody and Chinese media reports said Mr Song was detained in southern China on Thursday.

 

On Tuesday, a journalist working for China’s official Xinhua News Agency publicly alleged that Mr Song had used his mistress as a “channel” to receive huge bribes and launder money.

 

Writing on his Weibo microblog, the journalist, Wang Wenzhi, also alleged that Mr Song “used his influence” to get his mistress, Yang Lijuan, a job at UBS, working at its Hong Kong and Shanghai branches.

 

The Swiss bank declined to comment on the allegations, but one person at the bank who declined to be named confirmed Yang Lijuan, who also goes by the name Helen Yang, was a staff member and that the bank was looking into the allegations.

 

On Wednesday, Mr Song issued a strong rebuttal on China Resources’ website, describing the allegations as “completely false and an ill-intentioned attack that is meant to smear me”.

 

But on Friday, China Resources said Qiao Shibo, its general manager, had taken over Mr Song’s responsibilities at the company while Mr Song was being investigated for corruption.

 

“We must especially strengthen supervision of senior cadres, particularly the top leaders, and work hard to establish a punishment and prevention system that makes sure cadres dare not be corrupt, cannot be corrupt and find it hard to be corrupt,” Mr Qiao told the assembled senior management of China Resources on Friday, according to a transcript published by the company.

 

September 2013: An anti-corruption campaign by Chinese President Xi Jinping claimed another high-profile victim, as the state tries to address rampant graft and public discontent with Communist party officials. The FT’s Ben Marino reports

 

In July last year, Mr Wang alleged that China Resources overpaid for mining rights in a 2010 deal arranged by Mr Song involving massive corruption.

 

Keith Darby, a British real estate developer and former steeplechase jockey, has also alleged that China Resources employees, with Mr Song’s knowledge, forged documents to illegally seize land on the tropical island of Hainan that belonged to a joint venture with Mr Darby.

 

China’s President Xi Jinping launched a high-profile war on corruption in late 2012 that has already claimed thousands of victims.

 

In the coming weeks, the government is expected to unveil public accusations against Zhou Yongkang, the former head of China’s internal security apparatus who was detained late last year. If his case goes ahead he will be the most senior official to be put on trial for corruption since the founding of the People’s Republic in 1949.

 

Over the past year, anti-corruption investigators appear to have frequently recruited respected journalists to publish lurid allegations on the internet. In each case the authorities have then “responded to public pressure” by detaining their targets and launching investigations into the allegations.

 

Until recently the anti-corruption authorities have been too busy with the Zhou Yongkang case but that is now coming to an end. By investigating Song Lin it looks like the leadership has decided to go after He Guoqiang

 

By using this tactic they have been able to neutralise the powerful patronage networks that have protected officials in the past.

 

Mr Wang could not be reached for comment on Friday and he has denied acting on behalf of the authorities in the past.

 

In the allegations he published this week, Mr Wang said he had provided proof to party investigators that Ms Yang and her relatives owned more than Rmb1bn ($160m) in assets, including villas in cities across China and “huge deposits” in overseas and domestic banks.

 

Mr Song and Ms Yang could not be reached for comment.

 

According to records published by transparency advocate David Webb in Hong Kong, Ms Yang worked for Credit Suisse from 2009 until 2012, when she went to work for UBS.

 

Mr Song worked his way up from an internship at China Resources in the mid-1980s to become chairman in 2008 of a company that employs 400,000 people and boasts assets of more than $120bn.

 

With business interests including real estate, supermarkets, coal, medicine and beer, one of the company’s key roles is to export mainland Chinese products, including energy, to the former British colony of Hong Kong.

 

According to people familiar with the matter and reports from Chinese-language media based outside the country, Mr Song is closely associated with the son of former high-ranking Chinese official He Guoqiang.

 

Until his retirement in late 2012, Mr He was a member of the all-powerful nine-man Communist party Politburo Standing Committee and his main responsibility was to head up the party’s anti-corruption authority.

 

“Until recently the anti-corruption authorities have been too busy with the Zhou Yongkang case but that is now coming to an end,” said Li Jianjun, an anti-corruption activist and former journalist who fled to Hong Kong last year after publicly accusing Mr Song of corruption. “By investigating Song Lin it looks like the leadership has decided to go after He Guoqiang.”

 

 

 

SONG LIN: SEX. LIES + MONEY LAUNDERING LEAD TO REMOVAL AS CHAIRMAN OF LARGE CHINA OWNED COMPANY

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IF YOU HAVE EVIDENCE REGARDING THE SOPHISTICATED, ORGANIZED, INTERNATIONAL MONEY LAUNDERING OPERATION CONCEALING ITS CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES AMONG THE INTERNATIONAL BROKER COMMUNITY WITH COUNTERFEIT BANK DOCUMENTS + TRANSACTIONS ON THE INTERBANK SCREEN THAT WE ARE INVESTIGATING + EXPOSING ON THIS WEBSITE, CONTACT US AT THE SKYPE NAMES ON TOP OF THIS PAGE.

IF YOU HAVE EVIDENCE OF PRIVATE BANKING CORRUPTION, TAX EVASION, MONEY LAUNDERING or TERRORISM FINANCING, CONTACT US AT THE SKYPE NAMES ON TOP OF THIS PAGE.

….

 

Song Lin

CHAIRMAN OUSTED FROM JOB BECAUSE OF CORRUPTION + MONEY LAUNDERING

 

http://sinosphere.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/04/18/scandal-downs-chairman-of-a-top-chinese-state-company/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

For a year, the chairman of one of China’s biggest state corporations, China Resources, seemed immune to allegations that he had embroiled the company in corruption. That was until a reporter went public with the additional accusation that the chairman, Song Lin, kept a mistress who laundered his money.

On Thursday, the Chinese Communist Party’s agency for investigating corruption by officials, including managers of state-controlled companies, abruptly ended Mr. Song’s career, for now at least. He became the latest instance of a powerful party functionary brought down after accusations featuring illicit riches, extramarital sex and pictures taken in a bedroom.

“Song Lin, chairman and party committee secretary of China Resources Corporation, is suspected of serious violations of rules and the law and is currently under investigation,” the party agency, the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, said in a tersestatement on its website.

 

As with many other recent corruption scandals in China, Mr. Song’s downfall had the trappings of a gaudy late-night drama, including in his case shocking reversals, from steamy allegations one day to adamant denials the next and ignominy the following day.

Mr. Song joined China Resources in 1985 and by 2008 had risen to chairman of the corporation, which traces its roots to a company established in Hong Kong in 1938 to procure weapons and medicine for Chinese Communist forces. In recent decades, China Resources has grown into a sprawling conglomerate, with investments in retail, real estate, power generation and mining. Five affiliates are listed on the Hong Kong stock exchange.

In 2010, one of those listed affiliates agreed to purchase mines and other assets in Shanxi Province, in northern China, for $1.6 billion, a price that critics said was based on vastly inflated estimates of the value of the mines. Disgruntled shareholders tried to sue in Hong Kong. One of the lawyers representing them, Chen Ruojian, an attorney in Beijing, said the shareholders had halted their court action earlier this year, citing procedural hurdles, but were considering another attempt to sue.

Mr. Song’s position began to unravel this week, when Wang Wenzhi, a reporter for Economic Information Daily, a newspaper owned by the state news agency Xinhua, laid out his latest accusations against Mr. Song. Last July, Mr. Wang had already publicized allegations that Mr. Song had forced China Resources to go forward with a highly suspect, and hugely unprofitable, mine purchase.

On Tuesday, Mr. Wang used Sina.com Weibo, a popular Chinese microblog service similar to Twitter, to share a picture of Mr. Songcuddled up on a bed with a woman who, Mr. Wang asserted, transferred Mr. Song’s ill-gotten money into concealed investments and offshore accounts.

“Today I again in my status as a citizen and under my real name report that Song Lin has maintained a mistress and is also involved in massive corruption,” Mr. Wang wrote in a statement accompanying the picture. He alleged that the woman, under her own name and that of her relatives, had accumulated more than 100 million renminbi, or $16 million, in assets.

Mr. Song promptly and publicly rejected the allegations, just as he had the previous allegations about the mine deal.

“The contents of the accusations are pure invention and malicious slander,” Mr. Song said in a statement issued on China Resources’ website on Wednesday. He said he would sue those who made the accusations.

“This action has already done great harm to the reputation of myself, my family and the corporation,” he said. “I hope that higher agencies and the relevant authorities will carry out an investigation as soon as possible.”

Probably to Mr. Song’s lasting regret, by the next day the party agency granted his wish for an investigation. After it finishes, the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection can recommend whether there is evidence of wrongdoing and whether there should also be a police inquiry, usually ending in trial and conviction.

By late Thursday night, Mr. Song’s statement defending himself had disappeared from the China Resources website. Instead, the company issued a statement that it would “fully cooperate with the investigation.”