Posts tagged ALEJANDRO LAVALLE ESPINOZA

OSCAR VILLARREAL CHARGED WITH 19 FEDERAL COUNTS THAT INCLUDE 7 COUNTS FOR MONEY LAUNDERING, 1 COUNT INVESTMENT ADVISOR FRAUD

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WANTED BY FBI
Oscar Villarreal

 

http://www.wkyc.com/story/news/local/cuyahoga-county/2014/09/16/investment-adviser-wanted/15734885/

 

A former Gates Mills resident is accused of defrauding investors out of millions of dollars, and the FBI is asking for the public’s help finding him.

A 19-count federal indictment alleges Oscar Villarreal, 27, of Mexico operated a $9.6 million investment scheme and used the money he took to purchase a Lamborghini and a Steinway piano and otherwise live a lavish lifestyle.

He is charged with 10 counts of wire fraud, seven counts of money laundering, one count of securities fraud and one count of investment adviser fraud.

“This defendant used lies and deception to rip off investors and lead an extravagant lifestyle,” said Steven M. Dettelbach, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Ohio.

“Mr. Villarreal utilized his charisma and bogus information to defraud hard working individuals,” said Stephen D. Anthony, special agent in charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Cleveland office. “It is believed that Mr. Villarreal has fled the Cleveland area and the FBI is asking the public to provide any information they have regarding his current whereabouts so that he may answer for his numerous years as a fraudster.”

“When you knowingly mix deceit and trickery into the financial well-being of individuals, you create a recipe for devastation that could last a lifetime,” said Kathy A. Enstrom, special agent in charge, IRS Criminal Investigation, Cincinnati Field Office.

The investment scheme took place between 2008 and 2013. At different times, Villarreal operated numerous partnership or limited liability corporations, including WW Capital III L.P., WW Capital III LLC (also known as WWCIII), WW Capital Partners LLC (also known as Fund II) and Black Mountain Enterprises LLC and maintained several bank accounts and E-Trade trading accounts, according to the indictment.

WWCIII was a fund that purported to pursue investments with companies in Mexico related to the petroleum, steel, metals and real estate industries. Villarreal promoted and sold investment contracts in the form of limited partnership interests in the funds to approximately 46 investors in Ohio, Florida, New Jersey and New York in the amount of more than $9.6 million, according to the indictment.

From January 2008 through January 2009, Villarreal solicited approximately $550,000 from seven investors for Fund II, falsely representing the money would be used in the Mexican metal industry, according to the indictment.

In February 2009, Villarreal distributed approximately $715,000 to Fund II investors, which he misrepresented as profits from their investment. He failed to disclose to investors that he had received a consulting fee of $1.5 million from a Cleveland-area company for unrelated services, and that he used money from that, as well as from his personal line of credit, to pay Fund II investors. Villarreal later falsely represented to potential investors in WWCIII that Fund II had generated a 45 percent rate of return, when he knew Fund II had generated no returns, according to the indictment.

Rather than investing WWCIII funds for their stated purpose, Villarreal used investor money to make speculative trades from his E-Trade accounts, pay business expenses necessary to promote the investment scheme, purchase luxury items such as a Steinway piano and a Lamborghini, and otherwise fund a lavish lifestyle, according to the indictment.

Villarreal falsely reported to WWCIII investors, both orally and in writing, that their funds would be pooled and used to invest in the Mexican steel and petroleum industries, Mexican real estate and/or Mexican infrastructure projects. Villarreal further represented that he would use personal and family business connections in Mexico to make the investments, according to the indictment.

Instead, he diverted investor funds into an E-Trade account where he made speculative stock trades which lost millions of dollars in investor funds. Villarreal falsely represented to WWCIII investors that they were achieving positive returns on their investments, causing most investors to be lulled into the belief they were making money. Based upon his false statements, some of the WWCIII investors placed even more money into other investment opportunities offered by Villarreal, according to the indictment.

This indictment is the result of an investigation by Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Internal Revenue Service — Criminal Investigations and the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Adam Hollingsworth and Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Derek Kleinmann.

Anyone with information about Villarreal’s whereabouts is asked to contact the FBI at (216) 522-1400.

ROY GILLAR, SOPHISTICATED FRAUDSTER + MONEY LAUNDERER, LIVES IN HENDERSON, NEVADA

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IF YOU CAN SEND US THE ADDRESS + PHOTOS OF ROY GILLAR IN HENDERSON, CONTACT US AT THE SKYPE NAMES ON TOP OF THIS PAGE.

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HENDERSON

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PRIVATE JET ARRESTED WITH $10M IN SA ALLEGEDLY BELONGS TO CAN PASTOR AYO ORITSEJAFOR

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2 SUITCASES WITH $10M CAUSE MONEY LAUNDERING SCANDAL

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AYO ORITSEJAFOR

 

http://dailypost.ng/2014/09/16/jet-arrested-10million-south-africa-allegedly-belongs-can-president-ayo-oritsejafor/

 

Respected cleric and leader of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN), Pastor Ayo Oritsejafor has been caught up in the web of money laundering as new indications emerged Tuesday that the private jet recently confiscated in Johannesburg, South Africa with $10 million allegedly belongs to the preacher.

According to an investigation by SaharaReporters, the pastor’s private plane, which he got as a birthday gift few years back with US registration number, N808HG was among the two jets cited by South African security officials on September 5.

The report claimed that the jet landed in South Africa with $9.3 million cash loaded in several suitcases.

Corroborating the report, the Nigerian aviation authorities told the online portal that one of the jets reportedly belonged to the founder of Warri-based World of Life Bible Church, while the second one was registered to Felix Idiga, the owner of Jafac Aviation Limited.

It would be recalled that Nigerians and an Israeli defense contractor, Eyal Mesiaka arrived in the jet, when they were accosted by South African authorities.

According to the report, Oritsejafor’s jet was released after top Nigerian officials wadded in, claiming that the Federal Government was aware of the weapons to be purchased.

The jet arrived with two plastic suitcases and two hand luggages with combination locks only known to the Isreali contractor, according to CityPress.

RICHERON BALENTIEN, CURACAO JOURNALIST, RESISTING INTIMIDATION TO REPORT CORRUPTION + MONEY LAUNDERING

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Richeron Balentien
Richeron Balentien

http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/09/netherlands-curacao-media-freedom-press/

CAR

It’s a Wednesday morning in May 2014, around 3am and still dark outside. Radio journalist Richeron Balentien, his girlfriend and their 2-year-old daughter are sound asleep until the smell of fire wakes them up. When they look out of the window they see Balentien’s car burning in the yard in front of the house. He immediately knows what is going on.

“It was a clear threat,” Balentien told Index on Censorship over the phone. “It was a warning, to shut me up.” The police confirmed the car was purposely set alight. The perpetrator has not been brought to justice.

The Netherlands is always found near the top of press freedom rankings, this year second only to Finland in the Reporters Without Border’s Press Freedom Index. But rarely taken into account, however, are the Dutch islands in the Caribbean sea. The largest of these, Curacao, became a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in 2010.

If Curacao was included in the Netherlands’ press freedom score, it might not place so high on the list. Journalists like Balentien face threats and attacks, as they fight a lonely and dangerous battle to get the truth about corruption and organised crime on the island out.

The attack on Balentien’s car happened just a few hours after Gerrit Schotte, the first prime minister of an autonomous Curacao, was arrested on allegations of money laundering and forgery during his time on power. He was released after a week in custody, but the investigation is ongoing.

Balentien aired the news on his radio station Radio Direct, while many other media outlets kept silent. “This is a small island,” he said. “Everybody knows each other. Most journalists don’t investigate. They don’t want to get into trouble”.

According to a recently published Unesco report, Curacao’s media are “not able to fulfil their role as watchdog of authorities and other powerful stakeholders in society”. It also highlights issues around journalist safety, stating that “some recent cases of harassment of journalists have caused public debate on the issue of safety and are reason for concern”.

The report concludes that social and political pressures lead to self censorship among the press, as “dependency on good relationships with sources of information on one hand and protection of relatives on the other hand is very much a threat”.

In May 2013 the island was shocked by a political murder. Helmin Wiels, a popular politician determined to rid the island of high level corruption, was shot dead by an assassin in broad daylight.

The atmosphere on the island has been tense ever since, Balentien said. “Nobody thought it was possible that someone of that calibre could get killed. It shocked the entire island,” he explained. “The atmosphere changed. Everyone is afraid.”

Two men were sentenced to life in prison for killing Wiels, but it’s still unclear who gave the orders. Many believe they came from high up. There has been speculation that former Prime Minister Schotte knew about the plan, said Balentien — something Schotte himself denies. Wiels had accused the state telecommunications company of involvement in illegal sales of lottery tickets.

The Wiels case is one of Balentien’s ongoing investigations. “I feel everything is being done to keep the truth about this murder behind closed doors,” he said. “We need to know who gave the orders.”

A 2013 Transparency International study shows “a general lack of trust in key institutions” in Curacao. The anti-corruption watchdog labels this “a major obstacle” which will “limit the success of any programme addressing corruption and promoting good governance”. As for the media, the report highlights the lack of trained journalists, with content open to influence by the private financiers and advertisers on which “many media companies are heavily dependent”. Few requirements to ensure the integrity of media employees also “undermines the independence and accountability of the media,” according to the group.

Balentien is sure that former prime minister Schotte gave the order to attack his car. “Sources told me that it was discussed within the party to set my car alight to frighten me,” he said. “I have never been afraid to talk about Schotte, his party or the corruption.”

Dick Drayer, the Curacao correspondent for the Dutch national broadcaster NOS, also believes there was a political motive behind the attack. “Schotte’s party is behind this, everybody knows that,” he told Index on Censorship.

Drayer has been working as a journalist on the island for nearly ten years. “I see is an increase of intimidation towards journalists. Journalists here are taught not to ask questions. There is verbal and physical violence. When you dig in dirty business in Curacao, you know you can get into trouble. That leads to self censorship,” he said. “In Netherlands the media controls the power, in Curacao it’s the other way around.”

While the island has had its own government since 2010, ties with the Netherlands are still strong. Corruption and organised crime in Curacao are occasionally discussed in Dutch parliament and the Dutch police is involved in the Wiels murder investigation.

But “the relationship is disturbed,” according to Dryer. “The Netherlands is careful to intervene when things are going the wrong way on the islands, because they’re afraid to be seen as the coloniser.” He thinks his country could be more involved when it comes to corruption and organised crime. “They should speak up more. The Netherlands worries about human rights in China, but when it comes to Curacao they say it’s an internal matter.”

After the car incident, Balentien’s station Radio Direct continued to receive anonymous phone threats. “I am aware,” he said. “I look around. I turn to see who’s driving behind me. I check my house before I enter.”

Despite this, he maintains he will keep up his investigative reporting on high level corruption and the Wiels murder case.”Because I don’t want this island to be ruined by these people anymore”.

VLADIMIR EVTUSHENKO, RUSSIAN BILLIONAIRE, CHARGED WITH MONEY LAUNDERING

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VLADIMIR EVTUSHENKO

 

http://www.rferl.org/content/evtushenko-arrested-russia-sistema-money-laundering-charge/26588656.html

The Russian Investigative Committee has announced the arrest for suspected money laundering of one of that country’s richest men, AFK Sistema head Vladimir Evtushenko.

 

Evtushenko is thought to be worth billions and has regularly appeared on lists of Russia’s richest tycoons.

 

The purported transaction in question is said to have involved shares in Bashneft.

 

“There are reasonable grounds to believe that the legalization [laundering] of property acquired by criminal means involved the chairman of the board of directors of AFK Sistema ‘Vladimir Evtushenko,’” Vladimir Markin of the Investigative Committee was quoted by ITAR-TASS as saying.

 

The alleged crime carries a possible penalty of seven years in prison and a 1 million-ruble fine, ITAR-TASS reported.

 

AFK Sistema has issued a statement calling the indictment “completely baseless,” Interfax reported.

 

Yevtushenko is described by “Forbes” Russian edition as a “former plastics engineer” who “co-founded Sistema and took it public on the London Stock Exchange in 2005.”

 

His worth was estimated at more than $7 billion in 2010.