FRANK PAVLICO

BRYNEE BAYLOR (DC Lawyer) BLAMES DEAD CLIENT FRANK PAVLICO IN HYIP FRAUD COURT APPEAL

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DC 1

ABOVE – BRYNEE BAYLOR
BELOW –  FRANK PAVLICO, FOUND HANGED DECEMBER 12, 2012

DC 2

 

http://www.nationallawjournal.com/home/id=1202713718546/DC-Lawyer-Blames-Dead-Client?mcode=1202617074964&curindex=3&slreturn=20150002082251

 

A Washington lawyer who faces securities fraud charges will try to convince a federal appeals court that she was duped by her client — a businessman whom she says took advantage of her legal inexperience to bilk would-be investors.

Brynee Baylor, a name partner at now-defunct two-lawyer Baylor & Jackson, stands accused by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission of helping ex-con Frank Pavlico III and his company, the Milan Group, cheat investors out of nearly $2.7 million.

Baylor says Pav­lico conned her, too. In oral arguments set for Jan. 8 before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, Baylor will try to persuade the panel — Chief Judge Merrick Gar­land, Judge Cornel­ia Pillard and Senior Judge Harry Edwards — that she “believed she was actively participating in a legitimate transaction,” according to her appeals court brief, filed pro se. “She had no knowledge of the details of the transaction and was only acting in her capacity as the attorney for Milan and [Pavlico],” Baylor wrote.

Baylor, who could not be reached for comment, noted that she convinced her mother to invest $15,000 with Pavlico — money that has not been returned.

Pavlico committed suicide in December 2012, a year after the charges were filed.

Baylor faces a difficult fight. U.S. District Judge Rosemary Collyer in August 2013 granted the SEC’s motion for summary judgment, ruling that Baylor is on the hook for $2.75 million in disgorgement of investor funds plus $746,000 in civil penalties.

“It is quite possible that Ms. Baylor began her representation of Milan and Mr. Pavlico as a starry-eyed lawyer in search of a rich client,” Collyer wrote. “At what point she discarded her responsibilities as a lawyer and became a participant in the scheme is not important. The record demonstrates that she actively participated in the fraud.”

Baylor was seven years out of Howard University School of Law — practicing with classmate Dawn Jackson in an office in D.C.’s affluent Woodley Park neighborhood — when she met Pavlico.

Pavlico, according to Baylor, called himself Frank Lorenzo to hide a prior drug-related money laundering conviction, and he claimed to be an “experienced and successful” foreign-licensed investor.

Baylor said she conducted research and “did not discover anything to contradict this appearance.” As for Milan, it was purportedly a financial company that assisted with project financing.

Baylor described her duties as standard transactional tasks — drafting and reviewing documents, corresponding on Milan’s behalf and holding money in a verified escrow account.

But much of the substantive underlying work was new to Baylor, she said in her appellate papers. Baylor said she was “forthcoming in her inexperience.” She wrote in her brief that “she has openly admitted that she did not have securities experience. In fact, at the time of this incident, she was still in the process of building her practice and further establishing her career as an attorney.”

According to the SEC, Milan ­promised investors returns ranging from 180 percent to 2,400 percent annually at little or no risk. The supposed investment involved the purchase or lease of bank instruments, including “standby letters of credit,” “bank guarantees” or “medium-term notes.” These instruments were purported to be “leveraged” to increase their value exponentially and then “monetized” and “traded” on a “platform,” generating extraordinary profits.

Baylor says she wasn’t the only lawyer fooled by what the Securities and Exchange Commission called “legal-sounding gibberish dotted with meaningless legal and financial terms.” She asserts that the SEC’s own evidence shows that the “transaction was elaborate enough to convince other attorneys that it was legitimate.”

In reality, according to the SEC, there was no investment. The money — including $746,000 in payments to Baylor’s firm — was spent on a Range Rover, a Jaguar, Jimmy Choo shoes, expensive restaurants and trips to the Bahamas, the SEC said.

Baylor’s former law partner, Jackson, was named as a relief defendant. She settled with the SEC for $162,000 in March 2013.

In November 2011, as the SEC was closing in, Baylor said she was tipped about Pavlico’s real identity as a former felon. She said she confronted him, and when he couldn’t prove who he was, she fired him as a client.

For Collyer, some of the most damning evidence against Baylor comes in the transcript of a call with an undercover FBI agent.

Baylor told the agent, who was posing as a potential investor, things that she must have known were false, Collyer found. For example, Baylor said Pavlico “just completed a transaction very similar to that and a wire is supposed to be sent out today to my escrow for the, for the, participants.” She also promised that the investors’ money was “escrowed the entire time.” She said “100 percent goes to the investment. And there’s no money that goes to, you know, fees or anything.”

Collyer concluded that “the record shows clearly that she used her authority as an attorney to attest to personal involvement and offer repeated validations of transactions about which she now proclaims ignorance.” Collyer said that “what matters in this case are the extensive material misrepresentations and omissions she made to investors concerning the use of their investment funds.”

 

DEADLY INVESTMENTS

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IF YOU HAVE EVIDENCE REGARDING THE DEATHS OF THESE 4 MEN, CONTACT US AT THE SKYPE NAMES ON TOP OF THIS PAGE.
FOR BACKGROUND ON THESE 4 MEN, SEE THEIR NAMES UNDER “CATEGORIES” ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THIS PAGE.
….

ROBERT COX LLANDERAL (ASSASSINATED IN CAR 2012)

FRANK PAVLICO (FOUND HANGED IN HOME 2012)

PAUL COMBS (FOUND SHOT IN HEAD IN HOME 2010)

PAUL COMBS - CHERNOV--Pic. 01

REX JUDD (DISAPPEARED + ALLEGED MURDERED IN THAILAND 2005)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mq4wFgMBVs0


SEC WINS $3M LAWSUIT AGAINST DC ATTORNEY + OTHERS REGARDING HYIP

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http://www.law360.com/articles/467882/sec-wins-3m-fraud-suit-against-dc-atty

BRYNEE BAYLOR, ESQ.

http://www.sec.gov/litigation/litreleases/2011/lr22181.htm

http://www.sec.gov/litigation/complaints/2011/comp-pr2011-254.pdf

http://citizensvoice.com/news/informant-who-helped-topple-mob-boss-dies-in-apparent-suicide-1.1415827

 

FRANK PAVLICO lll

(Suicide December 2012)

2011 FRANK PAVLICO INDICTED (HSBC + BANCO DO BRASIL). 2012 FRANK PAVLICO FOUND HANGED.

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IF YOU ARE IN POSSESSION OF EVIDENCE REGARDING FRANK PAVLICO + BRYNEE BAYLOR or SHANNON + YVETTE JOHNSON RELATING TO ANY OF THESE NAMES, PLEASE CONTACTS US:

RALPH COHEN
HERBERT PINTOS
ALEJANDRO LAVALLE
PB TRADING
CDM HOLDINGS
BLADICK CORPORATION
ROSABRANCA INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION

http://www.sec.gov/litigation/litreleases/2011/lr22181.htm

http://www.sec.gov/litigation/complaints/2011/comp-pr2011-254.pdf

http://citizensvoice.com/news/informant-who-helped-topple-mob-boss-dies-in-apparent-suicide-1.1415827

 

FRANK L. PAVLICO III  found hanged in December 2012 + BRYNEE BAYLOR

http://www.grazianofuneralhome.com/sitemaker/sites/GRAZIA1/obit.cgi?user=848322PavlivoIII
Photo: N/A, License: N/A 

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